Investigations & Analysis - Northern Ireland
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Dementia

Gnangara front page
Gnangara front page

The new model of care: struggling supported living dementia scheme £800k in debt

05 SEPTEMBER 2013

BY NIALL MCCRACKEN

A MULTI-MILLION pound purpose-built supported living scheme for people with dementia is still struggling to fill places over two-and-a-half years after opening.

Eighty percent of Gnangara’s supported living units just outside Enniskillen remain vacant, with the latest figures showing the development is currently running a deficit of £800k.

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Gnangara opened in October 2011

State of the art dementia centre almost empty

26 MARCH 2012 – NIALL MCCRACKEN

A STATE of the art supported living centre for people with dementia still lies practically empty a year-and-a-half after it first opened its doors.

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dementia
dementia

No money for dementia strategy

07 NOVEMBER 2011 – NIALL MCCRACKEN

It was flagged as urgent; to be taken up immediately by the Health Minister and Executive after the elections in May, but now the Minister for Health, Social Services & Public Safety has announced that there isn’t enough money to fund a dementia strategy.

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Diagnosis can be a traumatic experience
Diagnosis can be a traumatic experience

Executive accused of failing dementia sufferers

17 APRIL 2011 – NIALL MCCRACKEN

THREE years after the Executive made a commitment to put a policy in place, Northern Ireland still hasn't got an agreed strategy for dealing with the growing problem of dementia in Northern Ireland.

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The cost of caring
The cost of caring

Cracking the care conundrum

17 APRIL 2011 – NIALL MCCRACKEN

AROUND a quarter of the £230million-a-year of public funds spent on dementia goes towards informal care costs, with the rest divded up between health institutions. We examine what the human, as well as the financial cost really is.

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Bishop Brian Hannon

Learning to live with dementia

17 APRIL 2011 – NIALL MCCRACKEN

BISHOP Brian Hannon was diagnosed with Alzheimer's after a routine check up with his local GP four years ago. He believes he is living proof that dementia does not have to be a death sentence.

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